5 Amazing Football Stadium in the World

1. Allianz Arena Stadium


5 Amazing Football Stadium in the World - The Allianz Arena [ʔaˈli̯ant͡s ʔaˈʁeːna] is a football stadium in Munich, Bavaria, Germany with a 75,024 seating capacity. Widely known for its exterior of inflated ETFE plastic panels, it is the first stadium in the world with a full color-changing color exterior. Located at 25 Werner-Heisenberg-Allee at the northern edge of Munich's Schwabing-Freimann borough on the Fröttmaning Heath, it is the third largest arena in Germany behind Signal Iduna Park in Dortmund and the Olympiastadion in Berlin.

The two professional Munich football clubs FC Bayern Munich and TSV 1860 München have played their home games at the Allianz Arena since the start of the 2005–06 season. The clubs had previously played their home games at the Munich Olympic Stadium since 1972. TSV 1860 München previously had a 50% share in the stadium but FC Bayern Munich purchased their shares for 11 million euros in April, 2006. The arrangement allows TSV 1860 München to play at the stadium while retaining no ownership.

The large financial services provider Allianz purchased the naming rights to the stadium for 30 years. However this name cannot be used when hosting FIFA and UEFA events, since these governing bodies have policies forbidding corporate sponsorship from companies that are not official tournament partners. During the 2006 World Cup, the stadium was referred to as FIFA World Cup Stadium Munich. In UEFA club matches, it is known as Fußball Arena München (Football Arena Munich) [ˈfuːsbal ʔaˈʁeːna ˈmʏnçən], and it hosted the 2012 UEFA Champions League Final.The stadium has been nicknamed "Schlauchboot" (inflatable boat). The museum of Bayern Munich, FC Bayern Erlebniswelt, is located inside the Allianz Arena.

2. Wembley Stadium


Wembley Stadium is a football stadium in Wembley Park, London, England, which opened in 2007 on the site of the original Wembley Stadium which was demolished in 2003. The stadium hosts major football matches including the FA Cup Final and home matches of the England national football team.

Wembley Stadium is a UEFA category four stadium. With 90,000 seats it is the second largest stadium in Europe and the largest stadium in the United Kingdom. It is owned by The Football Association through their subsidiary Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL).

Designed by HOK Sport and Foster and Partners, it includes a partially retractable roof and the 134-metre-high (440 ft) Wembley Arch. The stadium was built by Australian firm Multiplex at a cost of £798 million.

In addition to the FA Cup Final, the stadium hosts the season-opening FA Community Shield, the League Cup Final, the Football League Trophy and the Football League play-offs. It hosted the 2011 and 2013 UEFA Champions League Final, the Gold medal matches at the 2012 Olympic Games football tournament, and will host both the semi-finals and final of UEFA Euro 2020. The stadium also hosts the rugby league Challenge Cup Final, the NFL International Series and music concerts.

3. Beijing National Stadium


Beijing National Stadium, officially the National Stadium[ (pinyin: guójiā tǐyùchǎng), also known as the Bird's Nest (鸟巢 Niǎocháo), is a stadium in Beijing, China. The stadium was designed for use throughout the 2008 Summer Olympics and Paralympics. The stadium is currently used mostly for football matches.

Located at the Olympic Green, the stadium cost US$428 million. The design was awarded to a submission from the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron in April 2003 after a bidding process that included 13 final submissions. The design, which originated from the study of Chinese ceramics, implemented steel beams in order to hide supports for the retractable roof; giving the stadium the appearance of a bird's nest. Leading Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was the artistic consultant on the project. The retractable roof was later removed from the design after inspiring the stadium's most recognizable aspect. Ground was broken on 24 December 2003 and the stadium officially opened on 28 June 2008. A shopping mall and a hotel are planned to be constructed to increase use of the stadium, which has had trouble attracting events, football and otherwise, after the Olympics.

4. Aviva Stadium


Aviva Stadium is a sports stadium located in Dublin, Ireland, with a capacity for 51,700 spectators (all seated). It is built on the site of the former Lansdowne Road stadium, which was demolished in 2007, and replacing it as home to its chief tenants: the Irish rugby union team and the Republic of Ireland football team. The decision to redevelop the stadium came after plans for both Stadium Ireland and Eircom Park fell through. Aviva Group Ireland signed a 10-year deal for the naming rights in 2009.

The stadium, located adjacent to Lansdowne Road railway station, officially opened on 14 May 2010. The stadium is Ireland's first, and only, UEFA Elite Stadium and in 2011, it hosted the Europa League Final. It also hosted the inaugural Nations Cup, as well as the regular home fixtures of the national rugby team, national football team and some home fixtures for Leinster Rugby from August 2010 onwards.

Unlike its predecessor, which was solely owned by the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU), the current stadium is controlled by the IRFU and the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) through a 50:50 joint venture known as the Lansdowne Road Stadium Development Company (LRSDC). The joint venture has a 60-year lease on the stadium; on expiry the stadium will return to the exclusive ownership of the IRFU.

5. National Stadium Kaohsiung


The National Stadium (official name) (Chinese: 國家體育場; pinyin: Guójiā Tǐyùchǎng; also named 龍騰體育場), formerly known as the World Games Stadium, is a multi-purpose stadium in Zuoying District, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. It is currently the largest stadium in Taiwan in terms of capacity.

Completed in 2009, it is used mostly for football matches and it hosted the main events for the 2009 World Games. The stadium has a capacity of 55,000 people. Since the conclusion of the games, the stadium has been used for some Taiwanese football team matches.

The stadium, designed by Japanese architect Toyo Ito, makes use of solar energy to provide its power needs.  The stadium's semi spiral-shaped, like a dragon, is the first stadium in the world to provide power using solar energy technology. The solar panels covering the vast external face of the stadium are able to generate most of the power required for its own operation, as well as additional power that can be saved.
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