5 Ornamental Fish in the World

1. Mandarin Fish


5 Ornamental Fish in the World - Siniperca chuatsi, the mandarin fish or Chinese perch (not to be confused with the mandarinfish), is species of temperate perch native to the Amur River basin and other rivers in China. Its back is yellow, green, or brown, with many irregular black spots and patches. It has a big mouth and small round scales. This species can reach 70 cm (28 in) TL, and the greatest recorded weight for this species is 8 kg (18 lb). It is an inhabitant of rivers, some of which can become quite turbid i the rainy season. It is a specialized feeder on other fishes, particularly those which see poorly in low light. This species is a commercially important species and is also farmed.

The mandarin fish is very popular as food in China. Its name (鳜鱼) appears in many Chinese poems and books. The Koreans organize fishing festivals in the end of April in Danyang City with the aim of catching large specimens of S. scherzeri, which is a close relative of S. chuatsi.


2. Discus Fish


Symphysodon, colloquially known as discus, is a genus of cichlids native to the Amazon river basin. Due to their distinctive shape and bright colors, discus are popular as freshwater aquarium fish, and their aquaculture in several countries in Asia is a major industry. They are sometimes referred to as pompadour fish.

Discus are fish from the genus Symphysodon, which currently includes the above species.However, another review of the genus published in August 2007 suggested that the genus held these three species: S. aequifasciatus (the green discus), S. haraldi (the blue/brown/common discus), and S. discus (the Heckel discus). Further arguments have been made that S. tarzoo was not described in accordance with ICZN rules and thus should be considered invalid and replaced with S. haraldi, durrently considered a synonym of S. aequifasciatus by FishBase.
Captive strain

Other (sub)species have been proposed, but morphometric data (unlike in Pterophyllum, the freshwater angelfish) varies as much between individuals from one location as across the whole range of all discus fish species. S. tarzoo was described in 1959 and applies to the red-spotted western population. S. aequifasciatus and S. discus, meanwhile, seem to hybridise frequently in the wild or have diverged recently, as they lack mitochondrial DNA lineage sorting but differ in color pattern and have dissimilar chromosomal translocation patterns. S. discus occurs mainly in the Rio Negro. Whether S. haraldi is indeed distinct from S. aequifasciatus remains to be determined; if valid it is widespread but it might just be a color morph.

3. Moorish Idol Fish


The Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus), is a marine fish species, the sole extant representative of the family Zanclidae (from the Greek ζαγκίος, zagkios, "oblique") in order Perciformes. A common inhabitant of tropical to subtropical reefs and lagoons, the Moorish idol is notable for its wide distribution throughout the Indo-Pacific. A number of butterflyfishes (genus Heniochus) closely resemble the Moorish idol. It is closely related to, if not a direct descendant of, the extinct Eozanclus brevirostris, from the Middle Eocene of Monte Bolca.

The Moorish idol got its name from the Moors of Africa, who purportedly believed the fish to be a bringer of happiness. Moorish idols are also popular aquarium fish but, despite their popularity, they are notorious for short aquarium lifespans and sensitivity.

With distinctively compressed and disk-like bodies, Moorish idols stand out in contrasting bands of black, white, and yellow, which makes them attractive to aquarium keepers. The fish have relatively small fins, except for the dorsal fin, whose six or seven spines are dramatically elongated to form a trailing, sickle-shaped crest called the philomantis extension. Moorish idols have small terminal mouths at the end of long, tubular snouts; many long bristle-like teeth line the mouth. The Moorish idol differs from butterflyfish in having a prominent black, triangular anal fin.

The eyes are set high on the fish's deeply keeled body; in adults, perceptible bumps are located above each. The anal fin may have two or three spines. Moorish idols reach a maximum length of 23 cm (9.1 in). The sickle-like dorsal spines shorten with age.
Generally denizens of shallow waters, Moorish idols prefer flat reefs. The fish may be found at depths from 3 to 180 m (9.8 to 590.6 ft), in both murky and clear conditions.[citation needed] Their range includes East Africa, the Indian Ocean and the Ducie Islands; Hawaii, southern Japan, and all of Micronesia; they are also found from the southern Gulf of California south to Peru.

4. Pterois Fish


Pterois is a genus of venomous marine fish, commonly known as lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific. Pterois, also called zebrafish, firefish, turkeyfish or butterfly-cod, is characterized by conspicuous warning coloration with red, white, creamy, or black bands, showy pectoral fins, and venomous spiky fin rays.Pterois radiata, Pterois volitans, and Pterois miles are the most commonly studied species in the genus. Pterois species are popular aquarium fish. P. volitans and P. miles are a recent and significant invasive species in the west Atlantic and Caribbean Sea.

Pterois fish in the Atlantic range from 5 to 45 cm (2.0 to 17.7 in) in length, weighing from 0.025 to 1.3 kg (0.055 to 2.866 lb). They are well known for their ornate beauty, venomous spines, and unique tentacles. Juvenile lionfish have a unique tentacle located above their eye sockets that varies in phenotype between species.The evolution of this tentacle is suggested to serve to continually attract new prey; studies also suggest it plays a role in sexual selection.

5. Paracanthurus Fish


Paracanthurus hepatus is a species of Indo-Pacific surgeonfish. A popular fish in marine aquaria, it is the only member of the genus Paracanthurus. A number of common names are attributed to the species, including regal tang, palette surgeonfish, blue tang (leading to confusion with the Atlantic Acanthurus coeruleus), royal blue tang, hippo tang, flagtail surgeonfish, Pacific regal blue tang and blue surgeonfish.
Description

Paracanthurus hepatus has a royal blue body, yellow tail, and black 'palette' design. The lower body is yellow in the west-central Indian Ocean. It grows to 30 cm (12 in.).This fish is rather flat, like a pancake, with a circular body shape, a pointed snout-like nose, and small scales. The blue tang has 9 dorsal spines, 26–28 dorsal soft rays, 3 anal spines, and 24–26 anal soft rays.

The species' range is broad, but it is common nowhere. It can be found throughout the Indo-Pacific. It is seen in reefs of East Africa, Japan, Samoa, New Caledonia, and the Great Barrier Reef. The regal blue tang is one of the most common and most popular marine aquarium fish all over the world. They live in pairs, or in a small groups of up to 10 or 12 individuals. These fish reach sexual maturity at 9–12 months of age.

The regal blue tang is ranked LC (least concern) by the World Conservation Union (IUCN), but is of low vulnerability.
Males aggressively court female members of the school, leading to a quick upward spawning rush toward the surface of the water during which eggs and sperm are released. The eggs are small, approximately 0.8 mm in diameter. The eggs are pelagic, each containing a single droplet of oil for flotation. The fertilized eggs hatch in twenty-four hours, revealing small, translucent larvae with silvery abdomens and rudimentary caudal spines. Regal blue tangs can also, when faced with danger or dark spaces, make themselves semi-transparent, in order to help with evasion and light passivity, respectively.
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